123 Street, NYC, US 0123456789 [email protected]

爱上海,上海419论坛,上海龙凤419 - Powered by Makenna Bufu!

khmttxaew

first_imgThe Wolverines score 77.1 points per game and surrender 72.3 points per contest. The Wolverines will continue their Midwestern swing by playing at Chicago State Saturday. January 22, 2019 /Sports News – Local UVU Men’s Basketball In Action at UMKC Thursday Utah Valley ranks in the Top 50 nationally in field goal percentage (19th, 48.9 percent), three-point field goal percentage (23rd, 38.7 percent), free throws made (30th, 318), free throw attempts (36th, 440) and defensive rebounds per game (48th, 27.60). Utah Valley is led by redshirt junior guard Jake Toolson (16.2 points per game) while he is shooting 59.5 percent (116-195) from the field, ranking him 30th nationally, and 48 percent (36-75) from range. Toolson is also 23rd nationally in free throw percentage (88.9 percent). Brad James FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailKANSAS CITY, Mo.-Thursday, Utah Valley men’s basketball continues its WAC season by visiting UMKC to tangle with the Kangaroos. Tags: Chicago State/Jake Toolson/UMKC Men’s Basketball/UVU Men’s Basketball/WAC Sports/Xavier Bishop The Kangaroos come in at 7-12 and 2-2 in WAC play. They give up 75 points per game while only scoring 71.3 points per contest. The Wolverines and Kangaroos are meeting for the 19th time in history, with Utah Valley leading the all-time series 10-8. Written by The Wolverines are currently 13-7 and 2-3 in conference play as they commence this road trip. UMKC’s leading scorer is junior guard Xavier Bishop (15.8 points per game).last_img read more

khmttxaew

first_imgAn apology on the part of the Foundation and Toepfer’s family has been refused, since, says Wimmer, “no public apology can undo Alfred Toepfer’s individual responsibility or lessen his moral guilt. I find the concept of ‘apologizing’ for someone else’s guilt erroneous and not helpful […] it is likely to present a quick and hollow escape from a far more profound responsibility to learn the lessons from the past for the future.”In a letter to Pinto-Duschinsky published on its website, the foundation states that “as far as we know today, he did not participate directly or indirectly in the Holocaust, nor did he deny its existence.”Toepfer was never a member of the Nazi Party, and reportedly did not profit from wartime activities, which included the supplying of slaked lime to cover bodies in the Lodz ghetto in occupied Poland.Writing in the Standpoint, Pinto-Duschinsky warned of the danger of “greywashing” the Holocaust. He argued that “as long as the past is explained away, the moral basis for a new Europe cannot yet exist and British universities should not accept money tainted by denial”.Some, however, question the significance of the findings. Tom Kuhn, a fellow of St. Hugh’s and member of the Selection committee for the Hanseatic Scholarships, says that “the long and the short is that there is nothing new in the Standpoint article. Most of what has been published before has been the product of research funded by the Foundation itself. In my view the Foundation has, in recent years, been exemplary in confronting the history of its founder and putting the facts in the public domain[…] I don’t think an apology is either here or there.” Most of the details on Toepfer in Pinto-Duschinsky’s article had already been published in 2000 in a biography of Toepfer.“A boycott, of work aimed at international exchange and mutual understanding, does not seem a sensible way forward” said Kuhn.When questioned about this, Pinto-Duschinsky replied that “to say that an apology for Toepfer’s odious acts is ‘neither here nor there’ is morally flippant. It is incorrect that there is nothing new in my publication. It reveals vital findings. And the case against the University’s involvement with the Toepfer foundation has nothing to do with an academic boycott.”Many former students of Oxford are now having to come to terms with the fact that the source of funds from which they benefited are “severely tainted” by the history of their founding donor.Daniel Johnson, Editor of Standpoint and former recipient of the Hanseatic Scholarship, said “Those who administered [Toepfer’s] legacy have a duty to offer an apology to all those who were misled” adding that “Oxford…can continue to endorse the Hanseatic Scholarships only if their problematic provenance is fully and openly acknowledged”.Toepfer died in 1993, aged 99. In 1993, 1996 and 1999, protests led to the abandonment of annual prizes awarded by the Universities of Vienna and Strasbourg.No such decision was made at Oxford. The competition for the Hanseatic Prize was held last term, despite the ongoing review of Oxford’s position.Among the findings published in the April issue of Standpoint magazine, Dr. Pinto-Duschinsky reveals that Toepfer was closely associated with numerous convicted Nazis, notably SS Brigadier Edmund Veesenmeyer, the German diplomat in Budapest during the Holocaust overseeing the deportation of Jews to Auschwitz.Toepfer employed Barbara Hacke, the personal secretary to Veesenmayer from 1940-1945, as his own secretary, and Veesenmayer too was employed by Toepfer after his release from Landesberg castle, where he had been imprisoned for war crimes.Pinto-Duschinsky’s investigations also describe the case of Hartmann Lauterbacher, a former SS Major-General and former head of the Hitler Youth. Lauterbacher was in hiding having escaped from Italian custody. A request was made that Toepfer contact an associate in Buenos Aires asking him to help Lauterbacher set up a new life in Argentina. A copy of Toepfer’s letter of recommendation, dated 2 October 1950, survives in the Alfred Toepfer Foundation.The Foundation accepts the truth of all of these findings. Ansgar Wimmer, its CEO, told Cherwell, “for more than ten years this foundation has been actively trying to promote transparency and to face its past in a responsible manner. No one at our foundation today trivialises any aspect of Alfred Toepfer’s biography.” In a letter to the Frankfurter Allgemeine Newspaper, Dr. Pinto-Duschinsky calls for the foundation to recognize the “unvarnished truth” about their founder. Arguing that “truth and apology are among the essentials of reconciliation”. Fresh doubts have been cast over Alfred Toepfer, the controversial German multi-millionaire whose foundation provides prizes for Oxford students.An investigation carried out by Dr. Michael Pinto-Duschinsky, Britain’s leading expert on the funding of political parties and elections, has exposed evidence that Toepfer supported the Third Reich.According to the investigation, Toepfer took known Nazi war criminals into his employment, and assisted a high-ranking SS officer to flee justice.Toepfer set up the prestigious Shakespeare Prize in 1937, which has been awarded to numerous high profile British personalities, including Tom Stoppard, Simon Rattle and, more recently, Richard Dawkins. The Prize was discontinued in 2006.The Alfred Toepfer foundation also works in cooperation with Oxford University on the Hanseatic Scholarship programme, an annual prize worth €15,000 for graduates or final-year undergraduates of Oxford or Cambridge. The prize was originally set up through a collaboration between German officials, and senior figures at the Taylorian institute, in an effort to promote Anglo-German relations.The impact that these findings will have on Oxford University’s link to the Alfred Toepfer Foundation is as yet unclear.A statement from the University says that Pinto-Duschinsky’s material “will be reviewed by a special sub-committee of Oxford University’s Committee to Review Donations comprising representatives from the Universities of Oxford and Cambridge. The sub-committee will also consider the response of the Toepfer Foundation to these representations.”The sub-committee will meet on June 14 with Pinto-Duschinsky and with the chief executive of the Alfred Toepfer foundation.last_img read more

khmttxaew

first_imgJustices: State RICO Law Can Apply To Street CrimesDave Stafford for www.theindianalawyer.comThe Indiana Supreme Court ruled Wednesday that street-level crimes may be prosecuted under the state’s version of the Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act if the crimes aren’t isolated, affirming an Anderson man’s conviction of corrupt business influence related to a string of robberies.Chief Justice Loretta Rush wrote for the court in Ashonta Kenya Jackson v. State of Indiana, 48S02-1509-CR-554, that while the federal RICO act requires a continuing pattern of racketeering activities, Indiana’s corrupt business influence law requires a pattern of racketeering activities that were not isolated events.Ashonta Kenya Jackson drove a getaway car for a crew of younger men who robbed a liquor store twice and later a bank in October 2013. Jackson was charged with three counts of Class B felony robbery, and because of the nature of the crimes, the prosecutor also charged Class C felony corrupt business influence. Jackson was convicted on all counts and sentenced to 63 years in prison as he was also adjudicated a habitual offender.“Jackson was the mastermind behind each robbery, plotting the crimes and supervising his recruits. The blueprint he developed let him bear little risk, keeping a safe distance while his accomplices carried out the crimes and waiting to rendezvous with his crew until afterward. And Jackson’s coordination of the crimes became more sophisticated over time,” Rush wrote.“The third armed robbery involved a riskier target, a bank — and a savvier design, calling in a bomb threat to a local school in an effort to distract law enforcement. There is no indication that Jackson’s goal was short-lived and that he would have stopped after the third robbery; rather, the evidence points to the opposite conclusion. In sum, we hold that the fact-finder could reasonably infer from the nature of the crimes that they were not isolated or sporadic.”The case was remanded to the trial court to revise the sentencing order regarding which offense was enhanced by Jackson’s habitual offender judgment.FacebookTwitterCopy LinkEmailSharelast_img read more

khmttxaew

first_imgBudget mince pies received good ratings in a taste test on the website of independent consumer group Which? Netto’s mince pies were the cheapest tested at £1.19 for a box of six, but were rated more highly than Harrods’ pies which cost five times more at £5.95. Marks and Spencers’ pies triumphed with an 80% rating. The testers gave it full marks for appearance and it was praised for its ‘buttery taste’ receiving four out of five stars for taste and aroma.The mince pies available at Netto, Aldi and the Mr Kipling brand were named as Best Buys, and all cost less than £1.50. Co-op Truly Irresistible Luxury All Butter Mince Pies were also named a Best Buy receiving a 77% rating. They cost £1.59.Waitrose All Butter Mince Pies, Harrods Luxury Mince Pies, Asda Extra Special Rich Fruit Brandy Mince Pies and Sainsbury’s Taste the Difference received only three stars for taste.“Nothing epitomises Christmas more than that first bite into a mince pie. And there’s no need to worry about being Scrooge if you opt for a cheaper pack – the budget stores, like Netto and Aldi, are giving expensive brands a run for their money,” commented www.which.co.uk editor Jess Ross.Full results are available at www.which.co.uk/christmasfoodlast_img read more

khmttxaew

first_imgA new box set honoring the legendary David Bowie called A New Career in a New Town (1977–1982) is due out on September 29th. The box set is the part of a series that chronicles David Bowie’s long-running career, choosing highlights from different portions of his life, with previous releases in the series covering the years between 1969 to 1973 and 1974 to 1976. Ahead of the release of A New Career in a New Town, a previously unheard live version of “Suffragette City” has been released. This high-octane version of “Suffragette City” was recorded at the Spectrum Arena in Philadelphia on April 29th, 1978.James Murphy Credits David Bowie For The Reunion Of LCD SoundsystemBowie’s April 29th, 1978 performance in Philly was part of a string of shows captured on Stage, Bowie’s 1978 live album. While this rendition of “Suffragette City” never made the cut for the original 1978 release of Stage nor the 2005 reissue, the recording was discovered during this new box set’s compilation. You can take a listen to this new live version of “Suffragette City” from 1978 below, plus keep an eye out for A New Career in a New Town when it comes out later in the month. The David Bowie box set, A New Career in a New Town,  includes an expanded version of Stage (also featuring a previously unheard version of “Jean Genie”) and remastered versions of Bowie’s Berlin Trilogy (featuring 1977’s Low and “Heroes” plus 1979’s Lodger) and 1980’s Scary Monsters (and Super Creeps). The box set also includes the Heroes EP (a previously unavailable EP with French and German versions of “Heroes”) and a number of bonus mixes, singles, soundtrack contributions, and B sides. You can check out all the contents within A New Career in a New Town here and pick it up when it drops later in the month on September 29th.[H/T Rolling Stone]last_img read more

khmttxaew

first_imgIt looks like there’s some rustling in the Tom Petty camp. A countdown clock recently appeared on the late rockstar’s official website, with an expiration time of 10 a.m. ET tomorrow morning (Wednesday, July 11th). An image of the late singer-songwriter also accompanied the countdown clock.In the early hours of October 3rd, 2017, rock and roll icon Tom Petty was officially pronounced dead after nearly half a day’s worth of conflicting reports, most of which indicated that he had suffered a heart attack. Petty had just finished a large-scale 40th-anniversary tour with The Heartbreakers. He died from an apparent accidental overdose at the age of 66.Although unclear, speculation points towards the possibility of a reissue of Petty’s 1994 Wildflowers album as a double-LP release. Petty had been considering a tour in support of Wildflowers before his untimely death, his manager reported. Some fans have even speculated that the image of Petty on his website, looks strikingly similar to Petty during the Wildflowers era. Luckily, we only have to wait until the morning to find out what all the fuss is about!last_img read more

khmttxaew

first_img18-hour daysDerrill is the DARE officer with the Heard County Sheriff’s Department. June Jackson, another volunteer leader, and Ellen Nowicki, my co-worker, were in the girls’ cabin. Chris Nowicki, a 4-H teen leader, helped us all out.We had 18-hour days last week, from about 6:30 in the morning until we got them to go to sleep, which was usually about 12:30 a.m. That makes for especially long days at a camp like Rock Eagle because it’s so big.The camp itself is spread out over 110 acres. From cabin 54, the one farthest away from everything, to the 4-H office, is about a quarter-mile. And if you travel by the road around the camp, you’re going to travel about 2 miles.1,000 4-H’ers at campThe thousand 4-H’ers at camp, mostly 5th- and 6th-graders, were assigned to groups of about 15 or so. They changed to a different class or activity, led by one of about 65 counselors, every hour or two. So we spent our days going to the different classes and activities along with the 4-H’ers.I was with a group of Blue Strings, or the ones who have been to camp before. We sailed on the 110-acre lake, climbed 45 feet up into the trees to ride the zip-line at the high ropes course, worked together to conquer the low ropes course, built a homemade raft and floated it to “Gilligan’s Island,” went canoeing, climbed to the top of the climbing wall and caught all kinds of little critters in the Lake Ecology class.Two huge swimming poolsAnd for fun we went swimming in one of two huge swimming pools, one of which has a water slide.Derrill was with a group of Red Strings all week. They’re the younger, first-year campers. Another group is known as the White Strings. They’re first-year campers, too, but may be a little older than the Red Strings. Both groups had their own agenda for the week.One of the favorite classes of the Red and White Strings was herpetology, better known as the “Snake Class.” It was a favorite for the boys because it was taught by a beautiful, blonde counselor named Devon.A long, long wayAll of these classes and activities took place from one end of Rock Eagle Camp to the other. And that’s a long, long way, especially when you have to walk everywhere.But I learned a long time ago to carry my bike, and I told Derrill to bring one, too. We rode between 4 and 5 miles every day keeping up with the campers and counselors, and in our other duties.But every day, about 5 o’clock in the evening, when all the campers were in the cabins meeting with their counselors, Derrill and I would park our bikes and set out in front of our cabins. Derrill would get out his guitar, and I’d get out my banjo, and for the next hour we’d play.The quarter-flippingDerrill is a better guitarist than I am a banjo player, so we mostly played the songs that I could play.This is where all the quarter-flipping started.You see, the kids on their way to supper (or if you prefer, dinner) had to pass by us. And many of them would stop, take a picture of us and flip mostly quarters into my open banjo case.We made all of $3.15 and had a great time.last_img read more

khmttxaew

first_imgFederal Subsidies Favor Taxpayer-Owned Oil, Gas, and Coal FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享The Hill:President Trump’s energy policies have established a wide-spread effort to rig the economy in favor of big energy and mining companies at the expense of the American public, while burying the evidence in secrecy.Early on, the Trump administration and Congress acted to keep its energy giveaways secret by repealing requirements that fossil fuel companies disclose publicly their tax, royalty and lease payments to federal and state governments. The rule, which had bipartisan support when it was included in the Dodd-Frank financial reform law, was part of a 50-plus nation anti-corruption movement — an effort Zinke has announced the U.S. will abandon.For other countries, disclosing government payments by oil, gas, and coal companies is aimed at detecting bribes. In the U.S., the overturned rule would have revealed how little those companies pay in taxes, public royalties and lease payments. Researchers and reporters could have tracked the hidden subsidies to fossil fuel companies — information those companies do not want the public to know.This first step by the Trump administration to keep subsidies secret was a setup for enormous actions to convert public lands into profit centers for oil, gas and coal corporations at great cost to the public and with a reckless disregard of the law. These actions include:Interior, conferring secretly with fossil fuel companies, repealed rules closing loopholes that have cost American taxpayers tens of billions in lost revenue.To replace those rules, Interior Secretary Ryan Zinke appointed a royalty policy committee beset with conflicts of interest including companies that — having incurred half of Interior’s fines — are among the worst violators of royalty rules.Zinke cut the royalty rate on offshore oil to 12.5 percent from the 18.75 percent rate set in the George W. Bush administration.Interior is vastly expanding oil, gas, and coal leasing when energy prices are low — guaranteeing bargain basement prices for public resources and short-changing American taxpayers, states and communities.Interior has targeted for elimination or reduction virtually every effort to identify and mitigate environmental damage caused by energy development, shifting costs to the public that should be paid by industry.Trump, following a blueprint prepared in secret by Zinke, is shrinking several national monuments and seemingly turning these sensitive lands into oil and gas fields, coal and uranium mines to be sold under lax lease and royalty policies.Fossil fuel subsidies cause real harm. In October, the magazine Nature published a major study showing that at $50 a barrel for oil, nearly half of the oil production would be unprofitable except for federal subsidies. Simply put: oil production is propped up by public welfare.While unjustified subsidies for fossil fuels have long existed, their expansion in the Trump administration in the face of climate change is a disgraceful scandal. Keeping the subsidies secret is unconscionable. For years, public interest groups have worked separately on parts of these problems. Some focused on bribery and influence peddling by energy companies. Tax justice groups fought to end unjustified tax breaks. Conservation groups resisted giveaways of public lands and minerals. Meanwhile, not enough has been done to create sustainable opportunities for communities and workers.The separate efforts have yielded too little progress. It is time for citizen groups and concerned officials to launch coordinated efforts to end the hidden subsidies to fossil fuel companies, stop Trump and Zinke’s giveaways, and develop a better future for public lands and the people who depend on them.Trump’s looming scandal of fossil fuel subsidies on federal landslast_img read more

khmttxaew

first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The NCUA in June issued one prohibition order, prohibiting an individual previously associated with a credit union from any future participation in the affairs of a federally-insured financial institution.Violation of a prohibition order is a felony offense punishable by imprisonment and a fine of up to $1 million. Details from last month’s prohibition order follow:Paul Aimone, a former employee of Midwest Carpenters & Millwrights in Hobart, Ind., agreed and consented to the issuance of a prohibition order and agreed to comply with all its terms to settle and resolve the NCUA Board’s claim against him. continue reading »last_img

khmttxaew

first_imgWood says if colleges move to online classes only, it would take a direct hit to property owners leasing apartments, and downtown Binghamton as a whole. With many students now faced with uncertainty when it comes to the Fall semester, apartment and home owners who lease to students are getting nervous. Empire Property Management in Binghamton says it’s already seeing a number of students trying to break their leases. Binghamton University released a plan approved by the governor that includes a mix of online and in-person classes. With the uncertainty of the coronavirus, however, Empire Property Management says many of their student tenants still haven’t made a decision. center_img BINGHAMTON (WBNG) — Much of the greater Binghamton area houses college students, as the student population grows at Binghamton University. “People that have signed leases from a year ago now don’t even know if they’re going to be going back to school,” said Office Manager Carol Wood. last_img read more