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first_imgOcean City junior quarterback Joe Repetti scores a rushing TD against Long Branch. (Photos courtesy of OCHSfootball.com) By TIM KELLYEverybody loves a winner, and an underdog winner gets extra love.At least that seems to be the case for the seventh-seeded Ocean City High School football team, which lines up at top-seeded, two-time defending champs Shawnee’s Medford campus 7 p.m. Friday for a shot at the South Jersey Group 4 title.The Red Raiders, currently 8-2 overall, including two come-from-behind playoff wins on the road against higher seeded teams, have been attracting a lot of attention lately.They are the lowest seeded team in the state playoffs to advance to the sectional finals. If they win, it would be O.C.’s first state championship since 2000.“We are hoping everyone picks against us,” O.C. Head Coach Kevin Smith said in an e-mail. “The underdog role suits us well.”Maybe it’s time for Ocean City fans to dust off those dog masks from the Eagles’ 2017 Super Bowl run. The Raiders have drawn big crowds of supporters on the road all season. But with the games available for viewing live on the internet, Raider Nation has gone national and even international. “I have heard from people all over the country the past few weeks who have watched us live from California, Florida, Washington, Arizona and Connecticut,” Smith said.He added that one of the player’s grandparents were heard from during a vacation in the Caribbean. “You all are experienced road warriors,” Smith told supporters. “Let’s do it again and pack the house at Shawnee Friday night.” Ocean City Head Coach Kevin Smith will match wits with 37-year veteran Shawnee coach Tim Gushue.Ocean City’s season, remarkable on its face, seems even more impressive given that the team has played only three games at home at Carey Stadium.The Raiders punched their ticket to the finals last Friday with a 21-20 thriller at Long Branch, a 90-mile drive from Ocean City. Before that, they avenged a bitter regular season loss at Mainland with a 21-14 victory in the tourney’s opening round, also at the Mustang Corral in Linwood.Shawnee didn’t have it any easier. The Renegades traveled to Neptune to post a hard-fought 31-21 opening round win and then came from behind to defeat Millville, also on the road, 27-18.Junior two-way back Nate Summerville was the star of the game for Shawnee, catching a crucial fourth quarter TD pass and breaking up a two-point conversion pass attempt that would have tied the game earlier in the period. Shawnee is coached by Tim Gushue, one of the longest tenured coaches in the state and a member of the school’s first graduating class. He has led the Renegades for 37 seasons, including four after undergoing successful quadruple bypass heart surgery. His teams are always tough and prepared. They have shown themselves to be mortal, though. The Renegades have two very bad losses on the books, including a 48-0 blowout at home to Woodrow Wilson and a 17-0 defeat to Williamstown two weeks later, also at home.If you want to play the common opponents game, Shawnee has a 14-7 overtime win at home over St. Augustine Prep, a non-public playoff semifinalist, which beat O.C. 35-3 in Week 5. However, Shawnee’s win was prior to the Hermits’ addition of two key transfer players becoming eligible to face Ocean City.None of that mattered to Smith during this week’s practice schedule. What mattered was his squad’s work ethic and resiliency.“I can’t express how proud I am of this team for their effort and determination,” Smith said. “They stayed focused, never quit and just kept playing football. The result is we are headed to the championship game.”The Red Raiders celebrate after their semi-final playoff win at Long Branch.last_img read more

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first_imgS&P said the fall in long-term inflation expectations would help schemes with the falling discount rate.However, should QE fail to generate economic growth, this would then further hamper schemes.“Funding levels for those in deficit could suffer a further 10-15% erosion if QE causes stagflation by failing to kick-start sustainable growth, warranting its continuation, but only causing inflationary expectations to move higher” S&P said.S&P data showed liabilities for the 50 schemes peaked at more than €500bn in 2012, with the current funding ratio at approximately 70%.Over the last year, S&P said the AA long-term corporate bond yields, commonly used in discount rate calculations, have halved to 1.45%.“The proximate causes of these falling bond yields have included a sluggish euro area economy,” it added.“Corporate bonds are not on the ECB’s latest QE asset purchase list, yet they have benefited indirectly from the prospective shortage of high-quality, long-duration assets as the ECB’s target asset pool covers government bonds with 2-30 year maturities.”It said it expected a euro-zone corporate scheme to reduce its DB discount rate by up to 150 basis points – with EDF, the French energy firm, seeing its liabilities increase by €7bn due to its 1.3 percentage point drop in discount rate.Using the calculations of inflation expectations and falls in discount rates, liabilities for corporates could rise by 11-18%.With this, the firm said it expected corporate schemes to manage the situation by continuing a shift to higher-yielding assets, increasing contributions, lowering benefits or reducing risk with insurance products.“In the medium term, the risk remains QE achieves nothing more than promoting stagflation in the euro area,” S&P said.“A combination of weak growth, inducing the ECB to continue with its aggressive monetary policy stance, and rising inflation would be a treacherous combination for DB pension schemes already struggling to contain their plan deficits.”In January, the ECB announced a €1.1trn QE programme to ensure the current deflationary pressure in the currency union ceased and moved back towards 2%.However, investment consultants across the Continent warned of the negative impact on DB pension scheme funding due to the combination of factors.Aon Hewitt global head of asset allocation, Tapan Datta, said the toxic cocktail of the economic situation in Europe could be worsened by QE failure to boost equity markets.Read Martin Steward’s analysis on the ECB move to boost inflation in the euro-zone The impact of euro-zone quantitative easing (QE) on long-term bond yields and defined benefit (DB) schemes could see funding drop by more than 15%, particularly in a stagflationary environment.The analysis of 50 corporate DB schemes in Europe showed the European Central Bank’s (ECB) €60bn a month QE plan could see liabilities increase by as much as 18%.The report, by Standard & Poor’s, suggested Europe’s top 50 companies rated by the firm would suffer discount rate falls due to the inflation-seeking central bank policy.However, even with investment returns of 8-12% achieved due to buoyant markets in 2014, “substantial growth” in deficits would occur due to the cocktail of average 30% underfunding and low returns on equities compared with bonds.last_img read more

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first_imgThe deadline for people seeking insurance under the Affordable Care Act is Monday.The original deadline was December 15th, but was pushed back because of the flawed launch of the healthcare website. Americans are required to have health coverage next year.Most carry insurance through their employer or government programs, but approximately 48 million Americans are uninsured according to the U.S. Census Bureau.The Obama administration says more than a million Americans have signed up since the websiite went live on October 1st.last_img

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first_img Loading… The 22-year-old scored his first Bundesliga goal in Sunday’s 2-2 draw with FC Cologne since arriving the Opel Arena last summer. Despite his limited game time this season, the young striker is confident he has improved and is hopeful he can do same when he returns to Anfield. “Coming here (Germany) is just to make myself better,” he said. “Even without playing for a while, coming in on Sunday shows I’ve really improved since coming to Germany. That’s the goal with being on loan,” Awoniyi told LiverpolFC.Advertisement “Even when you are not playing, you just have to be ready and keep on improving yourself and wait for your time as well. read also:Mainz 05 coach heaps praise on Nigeria striker Awoniyi “I don’t think I’m the same player as I was in the last few years. I personally have seen improvement in my game and I believe most Liverpool coaches have seen that as well.” “I just have to be prepared to improve myself and work on my weak points as well. When I’m back at LFC, I hope they will see that.” FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Nigeria striker, Taiwo Awoniyi, has said his aim of going to Mainz 05 of Germany on loan from Liverpool, is to improve his game, after which he will return to the Premier League side. Promoted ContentWorld’s Most Delicious Foods5 Of The World’s Most Unique Theme ParksBirds Enjoy Living In A Gallery Space Created For ThemWhich Country Is The Most Romantic In The World?The Best Cars Of All Time14 Hilarious Comics Made By Women You Need To Follow Right NowTop 9 Scariest Haunted Castles In EuropeThe Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read MoreCan Playing Too Many Video Games Hurt Your Body?Best & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too MuchYou’ve Only Seen Such Colorful Hairdos In A Handful Of Animelast_img read more

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first_imgThe Wisconsin volleyball team bounced back Sunday to sweep Michigan (25-20, 25-18, 25-20) to earn its first home conference win of the season while snapping a four-match losing streak in a weekend split.The Badgers (14-5, 2-4 Big Ten) won each set against the Wolverines (14-6, 2-4) by at least five points in a balanced effort that evaded Wisconsin in its previous four matches.Head coach Pete Waite said if the team performs like it did against the Wolverines, the Badgers would have more victories under their belt thus far in conference play.“It’s what we’ve always been capable of,” Waite said. “It was the consistency we were looking for.”Wisconsin grabbed the first set of the match for the first time since its Big Ten opener against Northwestern Sept. 21. Sophomore outside hitter Crystal Graff led the Badgers with five kills in the opening set, with senior middle blocker Mary Ording adding three more.With the score knotted at 19, Wisconsin won five consecutive points on the powerful serve of junior libero Annemarie Hickey, who pounded two-straight service aces in that run. She totaled four aces in the match.Waite said he was pleased the team’s serving disrupted Michigan’s offensive rhythm.“I think we served tougher,” Waite said. “I think that kept Michigan out of their offense. … Overall, [we had] just a good, balanced team effort, and that’s what we always aim for.”The Badgers established solid starts in the second and third sets by jumping out to 4-1 leads. Senior middle blocker Alexis Mitchell led the team with 12 kills in the final two sets and 14 overall on just 26 attempts.Mitchell’s more aggressive play, combined with precise timing from sophomore setter Courtney Thomas, allowed for more effective attacks.“I was just working on getting up quickly because I knew that I could beat their middles if I was running fast,” Mitchell said. “Courtney was just finding me in the air, so we really connected today.”Thomas operated an effective offensive system against Michigan, posting 38 assists on a .487 passing clip, well above Wisconsin’s team assist percentage of .349. Thomas’ connection with Mitchell was especially on-point in the third set, as the Badgers converted eight of their 17 assists in the set into Mitchell kills.Waite noted Thomas’ improvement from Friday’s loss and said her accurate passing allowed for more options for the attackers up front.“I think she found the middle, and especially Alexis, much more in transition,” Waite said. “You have to be a risk-taker to do that. When she does that, it opens it up for Alexis, it opens it up for the outsides, and it really worked well this afternoon.”Wisconsin out-dug Michigan 46 to 38, with Thomas, Hickey and junior outside hitter Julie Mikaelsen contributing double-figure digs.Wisconsin was effective in disturbing the attacks of the Michigan frontline. The Wolverines racked up 19 errors in the set, but UW held them to just 35 total kills, compared to the Badgers’ 48.While seven team blocks may not seem significant, Waite said Wisconsin’s ability to deflect balls rattled the Michigan hitters.“I think we deflected more balls, so when we deflect and slow it down, … it’s just as important when you can do that, and I think we did a good job of that,” Waite said.Wisconsin was unable to defeat the No. 25 Michigan State Spartans Friday (25-22, 25-21, 18-25, 25-23), who have only lost two matches all season.This was the first match Waite implemented a new look to the lineup – Mikaelsen saw more playing time in the back row, and sophomore Caroline Workman moved to middle of the back row as a defensive specialist. Workman set a career high with 18 digs in the match.“I think I just had a mentality tonight that I wasn’t going to let any balls drop,” Workman said. “Overall, our defense improved a lot tonight from last weekend; I thought we were picking up a lot more balls. Even front row players off blockers were a lot more scrappy on the net.”After dropping the first two sets, Wisconsin was able to take the third set largely due to a staunch defense that accumulated five blocks. With a 23-22 lead in the fourth set, Michigan State took to the final three points to put away Wisconsin.Wisconsin also showed resiliency in a loss against Ohio State last weekend, again grabbing the third set after falling behind 0-2.Waite said he wants to see more consistent play out of the team but was pleased with the team’s fight late in the match.“After a slow start, I was encouraged that we came out of the locker room [and] turned things around,” Waite said. “I thought there was a much different attitude on the court; they were playing with a lot more confidence.”last_img read more