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first_imgWith finals approaching, many students will begin to receive packages of study snacks and treats not only from their family, but also from their hometown’s Notre Dame Club. The Notre Dame Clubs, located in major areas around the country, are largely made up of alumni. Aside from the highly anticipated finals packages, many students do not know the scope of what these clubs actually do. Susan Darin Hagan, an administrator of the Notre Dame Club of Pittsburgh, said that their send-off event for incoming freshmen each summer is key to teaching students about the Club’s existence. “We try to connect with students at the very beginning of their experience,” Hagan said. “That way the students start realizing there is such a thing as an alumni club and it’s active.” For sophomore Jill Giunco, the send-off she attended for the Notre Dame Club of the Jersey Shore helped ease some of her fears about attending school in the fall. “I really felt more comfortable about the ND community after seeing other kids in the same position as I was,” Giunco said. “I even met some people I’m still friends with today.” Hagan said the Pittsburgh club’s most popular service is the buses that they provide for the five school year breaks. “I think the students like it, but I know the parents love it,” Hagan said. “Cleveland is on the way to Pittsburgh, so I’ll even have students from Cleveland asking if they can pay the full amount and be dropped off along the way.” Another service the Pittsburgh club provides for the parents is assisting them in buying tickets for football games. Hagan said parents are only offered tickets for certain games, so the club tries to help them find tickets if the would like to visit the University a different weekend. Another main event for the Pittsburgh club is its networking evenings. The club brings in professionals from various fields to meet current students, Hagan said. “It’s not solely to find jobs but really more to make some contacts, maybe pass out a business card and get some questions answered,” Hagan said. Katherine Piscopo Stein, president of the Notre Dame Club of Long Island, said her club also tries to help students with networking. “If students want internships or jobs, we encourage them to contact us,” Stein said. “It really depends on what the student needs, but we’ll do what we can.” The Notre Dame Clubs are also involved in organizing the University’s Summer Service Learning Programs. Hagan said this is one of the most time-consuming activities the Pittsburgh Club organizes. “We tailor our SSLP to the actual students and what their desires are,” Hagan said. “We spend time convincing places to allow our students to come in and work for eight weeks.” For the Long Island Club, Stein said most of their SSLP students are Long Island natives. “We can’t really dorm someone here so in the past we’ve usually gone with students who have a place to stay,” Stein said. Additionally, the Long Island Club sponsors pizza breaks during study days and activities for students to participate in while at home, Stein said. These events in New York take place not only over the summer but also over breaks. “Two years ago when Notre Dame [basketball] played St. John’s, we did a big event since it was over winter break,” Stein said. “All the current students were invited.” While still at school, students are looking forward to pizza from the clubs during finals week. Sophomore Chris Carr said he enjoys receiving packages from the Notre Dame Club of Detroit during finals. “It’s just a nice thing to get rid of some of the stress from finals and studying,” Carr said.last_img read more

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first_img ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr The NCUA in June issued one prohibition order, prohibiting an individual previously associated with a credit union from any future participation in the affairs of a federally-insured financial institution.Violation of a prohibition order is a felony offense punishable by imprisonment and a fine of up to $1 million. Details from last month’s prohibition order follow:Paul Aimone, a former employee of Midwest Carpenters & Millwrights in Hobart, Ind., agreed and consented to the issuance of a prohibition order and agreed to comply with all its terms to settle and resolve the NCUA Board’s claim against him. continue reading »last_img

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first_imgThe Selective Service System is the organization that manages registration for the Selective Service. They put out a statement saying they will “conduct business as usual”The Selective Service System is conducting business as usual. In the event that a national emergency necessitates a draft, Congress and the President would need to pass official legislation to authorize a draft. pic.twitter.com/M4tY2dLoX1— Selective Service (@SSS_gov) January 3, 2020 If you, or someone you know, received a text message saying you have been drafted by the military for WWIII, the United States Army wants you to know that it is a fake text.On Tuesday, the U.S. Army Recruiting Command put out a news bulletin notifying the public that these text messages are fraudulent.The US Army said they received multiple phone calls and emails asking about the messages, and the decision to enact a draft is not made at or by U.S. Army Recruiting Command.The texts messages people have been receiving claimed to be recruiters saying that they need to move to their native recruiting workplace for “speedy departure to Iran.” Other messages said “We’re aware that this number is not disconnected, you’ll be fined and sent to jail for minimum 6 years if no reply.”(Army Recruiting Command/Courtesy) The draft has not been in effect since 1973, so don’t fall for the fraudulent texts!Army security are looking into who is sending out these texts.last_img read more

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first_imgNo further details have been released.850 WFTL will keep you updated on this story as it develops. Palm Beach Gardens police are currently looking for a suspect that is believed to be involved in a carjacking incident.According to reports, the carjacking took place this morning at around 8 a.m. and officers chased the suspect northbound on I-95 and then east on PGA Boulevard.Police say the suspect took off on foot, and are currently still looking for the suspect.last_img

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first_imgAccording to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, this is “a big old fish.”In late December, a fisherman caught a massive Warsaw-grouper near southwest Florida. Now, biologists from Florida’s Fish and Wildlife Research Institute have determined that this is one truly impressive catch.According to the Florida Fish and Wildlife Conservation Commission, the angler landed a Warsaw Grouper weighing a whopping 350 pounds.The big catch happened in December with a hook and line in roughly 600 feet of water.Biologists with the FWC Research Institute estimate the fish is 50 years old.Warsaw groupers can grow to nearly eight feet long and can weigh up to nearly 600 pounds.The largest ever caught in Florida weighed nearly 440 pounds.While the FWC appears to be excited about this particular catch, they don’t promote fishermen targeting these fish. According to them, the “status of the population in the Gulf is unknown.”last_img read more

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first_imgTrailing in New Hampshire, Andrew Yang dropped out of the 2020 Democratic race for the White House as the polls were closing for the first in the nation primary. The 45-year-old entrepreneur and first time presidential candidate had hoped his signature idea of giving every American adult a universal basic income of $1,000 a month would help lift him to the White House. However, while campaigning in the second state to vote in the presidential contest, Yang decided it was time to officially call it quits.“By the numbers, the decision was pretty clear,” Zach Graumann, Yang’s campaign manager told the NewsHour on Tuesday. “It doesn’t feel honest to keep taking money and enthusiasm from our supporters, but also from the Democratic Party. It’s obviously a difficult decision, but we believe the right one.”Graumann said Yang no longer saw a “real chance to win the nomination” but hopes to have a future in politics.Graumann would not say who, if anyone, Yang would endorse, but did say he planned to support whoever Democrats nominate to go up against President Trump.last_img read more

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first_img18 Sep 2019 Gloucestershire edge ahead in Women’s County Finals Gloucestershire moved a significant step closer to defending the English Women’s County Finals title when they beat Lincolnshire 6 ½ – 2 ½ on the third day of this year’s tournament at Delamere Forest in Cheshire.That victory coupled by a defeat for nearest challengers Yorkshire means that Gloucestershire are now the only team with a one hundred percent record heading into the penultimate day of the tournament.The two leading teams now play each other in a match which will go a long way towards deciding the final outcome.Gloucestershire went into the third day with victories over Norfolk and Surrey already under their belts and against Lincolnshire they quickly got into their stride with foursomes victories from Bethan Popel and Alex Saunders, Ffion Tynan and Issy Hopkins and Claudia Ovens and Ebonie Lewis.Lewis beat Helen McDougall 4 & 2 in the top singles while Popel secured a 5 & 3 victory over Tilly Garfoot and Tynan and Saunders halved against Billie-Jo Smith and Ellise Rymer. India Clyburn and Meg Illingworth secured consolation victories for Lincolnshire against Sam Round and Megan Bartlett.Gloucestershire team captain Su Mallon was thrilled with the way her team performed on what could prove a pivotal day in this year’s event.“It was a really exciting day – and has added a few more grey hairs, “she said.“The team were terrific again on what is a beautiful but really quite hilly and challenging course.“Ffion managed to come back from four down to half her match and that was very important as was Alex’s half point in the final match.“Bethan and Ebonie won their matches and Megan – our little rookie – played so well only losing out on 18.“It sets everyone up for another great day on Thursday for the game against Yorkshire.“They will be smarting a little after losing today so we know they will be out to make amends, but we’re playing well and I’m so proud of my team.”Yorkshire had beaten Buckinghamshire and Norfolk on the first two days of the competition but their winning run came to a halt with a 5-4 defeat against Surrey. The 2017 champions appeared on course for a hat-trick of wins after winning the foursomes 2-1 but Melissa Wood and Evie Cooke were their only winners in the six singles. Lottie Woad, Jessica Adams, Rafiah Banday and Canice Screene all claimed points for the victorious Surrey team.In the other match on the course Norfolk collected their first win of the week with a 5 ½ – 3 ½ victory over Buckinghamshire. They were 2-1 up after the foursomes but lost two of the first three singles before Karen Young, Joanne Herd and Tiffany Mills all won at the bottom of the order. Abigail O’Riordan halved her match against Daisy Kennedy.The leaderboard at the end of the third day shows Gloucestershire on top with three wins ahead of Yorkshire with two and Norfolk, Buckinghamshire, Lincolnshire and Surrey all with one win apiece.View the live Women’s County Final scoreboardPhotograph credit: Leaderboard Tags: Buckinghamshire, Gloucestershire, Lincolnshire, Norfolk, Surrey, Yorkshirelast_img read more

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first_imgFacebook42Tweet0Pin0 A Stardust Christmas Blizzard runs at The State Theater in Downtown Olympia until December 31, 2013. Reserve your tickets by calling the box office at 360.786.0151 or online here. Submitted by Reesa Nelson for Harlequin ProductionsThe Stardust Christmas Blizzard is Harlequin Productions 18th Stardust Production.The holidays are always a magical time of year. And for many of those years, Harlequin has shared a multitude of sparkly toe-tapping Stardust productions with the community. Many thousands of regional theater goers have enjoyed the hits-filled jumping, jiving, and caroling as Stardust traveled through the 1940s. Now, after a brief break from the tradition last year, we are happy to visit times gone by in Christmas 1957 with the Stardust Gang. This year’s production, A Stardust Christmas Blizzard, marks playwright Harlowe Reed’s eighteenth production of the Stardust series. The playwright has graciously granted an interview so we could glean more insights into this vibrant delight.What inspired the leap in setting from the 1940s to 1957?HR: We spent seventeen years in the 1940s and covered over 200 songs from the period. I was ready to move forward in time. The 1950s may have a little more resonance with today’s audience owing to shifting demographics. In addition, the variety of material available broadens as you move forward in time.Do you have any personal attachment to this era?HR: I’m a social history buff and all eras have their fascinations. Mid 20th century America is an amazing time. We were a very young country that had come into a newly elevated position of power and wealth after WWII. Our culture was blasting off along with the accelerated economy.What is your process for writing a musical like this?HR: Rounding up the best cast possible and then writing characters that align with them. There has to be a kernel of story to get it going, but once I begin to let them tell their own stories on paper it rolls out from there. The music will usually be selected from the hits of the decade and be placed in the show to fit characters and situations.Where does your inspiration come from?HR: Actually while I’m in the midst of working on the current show, the idea for the following holiday may spring up. That’s often been the case. This year was different because I didn’t really know what would evolve until this summer. I knew there would be a blizzard but I didn’t know how it would turn out.How do you decide which musical numbers to include in the show?HR: We start with a list of perhaps a hundred songs that were hits and emblematic of the style of popular music during the era and narrow it down to 24 or 26 numbers. This process has to do with the vocal ranges of the cast and how many solos, group numbers and duets are to be included in the show. Emotional resonance with a number is a big influence as well.What is one of the ways you’ve infused the essence of the 50s into this show?HR: Some of the skits and introductions are framed up on several TV personalities like Ed Sullivan, Lawrence Welk, and Perry Como. One snippet is an Elvis Presley impression and a number of the songs in the show were, of course, made famous by iconic rock’n’roll stars.The Stardust Christmas Blizzard is set in 1957, a departure from the previous productions in the 1940s.Why is early rock’n’roll music still popular today?HR: I think it’s still popular because it is emblematic of freedom and individualism and these are dearly held values. When you look at the entire arc of pop culture as a mass-produced and multi-media experience, it’s not really that old. American popular music went overseas in WWII with the big band recordings and they changed the world. Rock’n’roll evolved out of that uniquely American form. But it wasn’t Big Band, it was small band and big personality. There is also an innocence in early rock’n’roll that would be almost completely obliterated by the mid-70s. That sincerity still has its charms.What is your favorite part about writing these wonderful musicals?HR: Having a great cast and seeing and hearing the show come to life. There is always an adventure to be had in inventing something new! The very best part for all of us is having happy audiences and feeling that we’ve contributed to and been an enjoyable part of their holiday!last_img read more

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first_imgFacebook0Tweet0Pin0 Submitted by Port of OlympiaWhen a boat named Sparky caught fire at Zittel’s Marina on May 24, the local protocol for marine fire suppression was put into action.Zittel’s towed the boat out of the marina for safety and called the Lacey Fire Department who contacted the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office.Sheriff’s Deputy Jeff Norton called Port Harbor Director Bruce Marshall at Swantown Marina and the two men piloted the Port Security Vessel/Fire Boat to the scene.Once the fire was out, they towed Sparky back to Zittel’s where the owner hauled it off on a trailer.The Port Security Vessel is jointly operated by the Port of Olympia and the Thurston County Sheriff’s Office.last_img

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first_imgShaffery thanked the parents for theircandor and asked the community to keepcommunicating. Superintendent Louis Moore said he believes lanyards can be valuable, but from experience he had concerns about getting a buy-in from the students. He wants to make sure the lanyard would “add value” to student life in some way, so the passes are not left behind in the house. By Christina Johnson “Everybody who works for me knows that in an actual incident, you are going to respond,” Shaffery told about 30 people gathered at the school cafeteria for the information session. “You are not going to sit there, you’re not going to wait for backup, you’re not going to wait for several other towns to get here. You’re not going to wait for squat. ’Cause if you do all that, it’s over. It’s done.” The other case, in March, involves a female who Oliva said was involved in a threat that could possibly be credible. He declined to elaborate. A few others, working in larger school districts, advocated for electronic security passes on lanyards for all students for identification purposes. In January, a male RBR student posted an image of a firearm with a caption on social media that was interpreted as a threat by some in the school community. He was charged with creating false public alarm. Shaffery and Smith both like the idea ofstudent lanyards. His head is always “on swivel,” he said, viewing 100 cameras on two closed-circuit monitors, engaging with the students at his alma mater, dialoguing with teachers and faculty on any concerns. Smith is supported by six security hall monitors – one a retired police chief and another a retired state police lieutenant. There are plans for a seventh to join the team. “We have a zero tolerance. Years ago, you would never charge someone for something like that. We charged them. We’re not fooling around, we’re not playing games with student safety.” “Building bonds with students is reallyimportant,” said Smith, 31, who attendedRBR. “That’s how I gain information.” Patrolman Andrew Smith, an armedstudent resource officer (SRO), is on dutyduring school hours. This year at RBR it was students who alerted law enforcement to two incidents that sparked police investigations. Both cases are “still in the judicial process,” said Shaffery, who said he was unable to provide too much information because they involved juveniles. center_img In a free-wheeling question-and-answer session, parents were invited to give feedback to school administrators and police. One brought up concerns about possible weak spots at entrances, which was noted by assistant principal Robert Donohoe. Inside the school there are visible signs of readiness. Blue “Wave” instant lockdown alarms are within reach on walls and on teacher lanyards, windows have been treated with a bullet-resistant coating to slow down an intruder, doors are numbered and hallways are color-coded for easy identification in an emergency. LITTLE SILVER – Police and administrators offered parents a glimpse into Red Bank Regional High School’s security plan Tuesday night, in a talk that revealed a history of preparation and sobering facts about how the school community has been forced to adapt to the nationwide threat of school shootings. RBR is one of the largest schools in the area, with over 1,200 students, 80 faculty members and 125 exit doors. Police Chief Daniel Shaffery said that for more than a decade the Little Silver Police Department has been working with neighboring departments and the county prosecutor’s office to be prepared to react to a trespasser, a bomb threat and other incidents – and fast. “Students in that position cannot come back on campus for any reason,” he said. “I will tell you we have zero tolerance. The two incidents here were reported to SARs, that’s the New Jersey Department of Homeland Security. That gets distributed to law enforcement.” SARs is the New Jersey Suspicious Activity Reporting System. Red Bank Regional High School educates 1200 students from Little Silver, Red Bank and Shrewsbury. RBR also includes vocational schools that serve students in and out of district. “It can be difficult, and sometimes it can backfire,” said Moore. “The issue is if you don’t think it through and you get a massive amount of noncompliance it puts you in a situation where you are two steps backwards. That’s why we’ve been very deliberate about it.” Another parent asked if the two students who left the school would be allowed back for any resources, or even testing. The answer is “no,” said Shaffery. School security is also a focus for Detective Sgt. Greg Oliva, who told the parents about some signs that might indicate intent to cause harm. Police want to know if a person is exhibiting suspicious behavior, he said. They want to hear about a new interest in weapons or violent behavior, among other things. Police can use interviews, social media investigations and internet browser history retrieval to gather information, he said. A full-time student resource officer has been assigned to Red Bank Regional High School since 2007, when the Little Silver Police Department, the Borough of Little Silver and the Red Bank Regional Board of Education entered into an agreement. Currently, about 1,200 students are enrolled at the school. Pictured, SRO/Ptl. Andrew Smith. Photo by Christina Johnson “Tonight wasn’t about bringing you in and scaring everybody but rather to get the dialogue going. We really appreciate it,” he said.last_img read more