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first_imgLoad remaining images With a new album on the way, the Chris Robinson Brotherhood have been sneaking new material into their exciting live performances. The CRB’s exciting blend of psychedelic Americana continues to impress audiences everywhere, merging the band’s older energy with new musical exuberance. At a trip to The Music Farm in Charleston, SC last Friday, July 15th, the band put together a dynamic two-set performance that featured the debut of a brand new song, called “New Cannonball Rag.” Of course, classics like “Hard To Handle” and more made their appearances as well, but it is the band’s continued direction down new avenues that keeps fans quite excited about their future.Watch fan-shot footage of the band playing “100 Days of Rain,” streaming below.Thanks to Ellison White Photography, we have some stunning photographs from the evening! Check them out, as well as the setlist.fm listing, below. Edit this setlist | More Chris Robinson Brotherhood setlistslast_img read more

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first_imgGrammy-nominated reggae-hip-hop-rock vocalist/beat-boxer Matisyahu has been keeping very busy as of late. Last year, he released his sixth studio album, Undercurrent, and proceeded to tour extensively behind the LP, including a late-2017 run with Common Kings and Orphan dubbed “The Broken Crowns Tour.” Matisyahu was able to multi-task during the tour, taking the time to record the upcoming fourth installation of his Live At Stubb’s series during a stop in Austin.The Broken Crowns Tour also included a memorable performance at the historic Capitol Theatre in Port Chester, NY–a venue that’s hosted a thoroughly impressive amount of world-class talent over the years. During the show at The Cap (a hometown performance for the White Plains, NY native), Matisyahu and company utilized the theater’s full-wall projection capabilities to introduce a new film that’s tied to the album’s message.As Matisyahu explains regarding the significance of the Capitol Theatre performance, “During the evolution of the Undercurrent album, we filmed a movie for the record. This hometown performance at the Capitol Theatre marked the first time it was seen publicly, projected behind us during ‘Forest of Faith’…”Today, Live For Live Music is excited to premiere the official live video of “Forest of Faith” from Matisyahu’s December 23rd, 2017 performance at The Capitol Theatre, featuring the Undercurrent movie projections. Watch the performance below:Matisyahu – “Forest of Faith” – The Capitol Theatre – 12/23/17[Video: Matisyahu]Matisyahu has hit the ground running with “Forest of Faith” and the rest of his new material in 2018. His “Forest of Faith Tour” with Colorado-based rock-fusion outfit Eminence Ensemble is already underway and will keep him and his band (guitarist Aaron Dugan, bassist Stu Brooks, drummer Joe Tomino, and keyboardist Big Yuki) on the road throughout the next two months.Explains Matisyahu:The Forest of Faith Tour means entering into the unknown of the music and creating unique musical experiences born out of the immediate here and now, much like the innate beauty and purity of the untouched forest. I am looking forward to starting out 2018 dancing, listening, singing, and making music together with you who allow me the opportunity…this February and March in a town near you. Blessings and love.You can check out a list of Matisyahu’s upcoming Forest of Faith Tour dates below. For more information, or to grab your tickets for any of the upcoming shows, head to Matisyahu’s website.Matisyahu “Forest of Faith” Upcoming Tour Dates:2/16 – Bellingham, WA @ Wild Buffalo2/18 – Vancouver, BC @ Rickshaw Theatre2/21 – Spokane, WA @ The Knitting Factory2/22 – Missoula, MT @ The Wilma2/23 – Park City, UT @ Park City Live2/24 – Boulder, CO @ Fox Theatre**2/25 – Colorado Springs, CO @ The Black Sheep2/28 – Des Moines, IA @ Wooly’s3/01 – Tulsa, OK @ Cain’s Ballroom3/02 – North Kansas City, MO @ Jannus Live3/03 – Nashville, TN @ Exit/In3/04 – Asheville, NC @ The Orange Peel3/05 – Atlanta, GA @ City Winery3/07 – Atlanta, GA @ City Winery3/08 – Macon, Georgia @ Cox Capitol Theatre3/09 – New Orleans, LA @ House of Blues3/10 – Mobile, AL @ Soul Kitchen3/13 – Chattanooga, TN @ The Signal3/14 – Charlottesville, VA @ Jefferson Theater3/15 – Newport News, VA @ Boathouse Live3/16 – Matthews, NC @ The Fillmore Charlotte3/17 – St. Petersburg, FL @ Reggae Rise Up Festival**3/18 – North Myrtle Beach, FL @ House of Blues** – without Eminence Ensemblelast_img read more

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first_img Robot builds erosion barriers from interlocking metal sheets, while robot swarms could protect threatened areas The Wyss Institute for Biologically Inspired Engineering at Harvard University announced today the latest gift of $131 million from its founder, entrepreneur and philanthropist Hansjörg Wyss, M.B.A. ’65.The Wyss Institute seeks to bridge the gap between academia and industry by drawing inspiration from nature’s design principles to solve some of the world’s most complex challenges in health care and the environment and commercializing those solutions to maximize their impact.“Hansjörg Wyss has helped to expand what we know and what we can accomplish across a wide range of disciplines. The advances that his generosity has enabled will change the future for countless people,” said Harvard University President Larry Bacow. “His third gift to support the work of the Wyss Institute will ensure the continued success of our extraordinarily talented faculty and staff, as well as create new opportunities for collaboration and growth. We are deeply grateful for his support.”In 2009, Wyss made possible the Institute’s creation with a founding $125 million gift. A second gift to the University in 2013 enabled the Institute to grow and advance its pioneering work. The gift announced today will continue to enable the progress the Institute has made during its initial 10 years, amplify its already significant impact, and sustain its leadership in the field of biologically inspired engineering. Wyss’ giving over many years and across the University amounts to more than $400 million.“When talented, creative people are given the freedom to work together across disciplines, there are few problems they cannot solve,” said Wyss. “In the last decade, the Wyss Institute has made breakthrough after breakthrough to improve medicine and to apply the latest science to the betterment of peoples’ lives. I am happy to continue my support for the Wyss Institute and Harvard and look forward to seeing what the institute discovers and creates in the years ahead.”Wyss’ support for the Institute’s unique model — interdisciplinary collaboration among scientists and engineers from disparate fields along with expert staff with industrial experience — has led to sustained productivity in the past decade, including more than 2,600 patent filings, 53 licensing agreements, 29 startups, and numerous industry collaborations. The groundbreaking discoveries, designs, and technologies the institute has produced across a range of areas have a shared potential to improve human health and the environment on a global scale. Included among the breakthroughs Wyss’ gifts have enabled are:Cancer Vaccine,One of cancer’s most insidious tricks is deactivating the body’s immune cells, which normally find and kill malfunctioning cells. A project from the lab of core faculty member David Mooney, Robert B. Pinkas Family Professor of Bioengineering at the Harvard John A. Paulson School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), in the Institute’s immuno-materials platform created a small implantable scaffold made of a biodegradable polymer that contains components derived from a patient’s cancer cells to act as “triggers.” When immune cells pass through the scaffold, they become activated and can successfully hunt and kill cancer cells elsewhere in the body. This process also creates a vaccine-like “memory” of the cancer so that any future cancer cells will also be killed. The technology was licensed by Novartis in 2018 and is currently in human clinical trials, where it is showing remarkable promise in treating patients with melanoma.Human Organs-on-Chips,Any drug that is developed for humans is first tested on animals to determine its safety and efficacy, but because animals are metabolically and genetically different from humans, drugs that work in mice or rats often fail in people. In addition, patients sometimes react differently to different drugs, but it is difficult to predict what those reactions will be before the drug is administered. One of the first startups founded to commercialize a Wyss technology, Emulate, Inc. aims to solve this problem with organs-on-chips: clear, flexible microfluidic chips that can be seeded with live human cells to recapitulate the function of human organs ex vivo. This technology was created in the Institute’s bioinspired therapeutics and diagnostics platform by the lab of Wyss Founding Director Donald Ingber, the Judah Folkman Professor of Vascular Biology at Harvard Medical School and the Vascular Biology Program at Boston Children’s Hospital, and has the potential to eliminate animal testing, greatly accelerate the drug development process, and enable personalized medicine.Synthetic Biology-Enabled Molecular Diagnostics,Diagnosing a patient with the correct illness is necessary to treat any disease, and recent diagnostic technologies have emerged that can determine sickness or health on a molecular level. However, most molecular diagnostic tools are costly, labor-intensive, and require advanced lab equipment, making them difficult to deploy in low-resource settings. A synthetic-biology-based diagnostic sensor in the Institute’s living cellular devices platform was developed by Wyss core faculty member James Collins, Termeer Professor of Medical Engineering & Science at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. It can detect molecules of DNA and RNA with extremely high precision and produces an easy-to-read signal. Crucially, this process can be done at room temperature and does not require any scientific instruments, allowing molecular diagnostics to be brought to the front lines of disease outbreaks. The technology was licensed by Sherlock Biosciences in 2019.Robotic Exosuits for Stroke Rehabilitation,Nearly a million Americans suffer strokes annually, and 80 percent of them lose the ability to use one of their legs normally. Even after undergoing physical therapy, many patients never regain a normal walking gait, grow more prone to falls, and become more sedentary. Wearable “exoskeletons” are being developed to provide support during walking and rehabilitation, but these devices are large, hard, and expensive, limiting their use. Working in the Institute’s bioinspired soft robotics platform, Wyss researchers in the lab of Conor Walsh, John L. Loeb Associate Professor of Engineering and Applied Sciences at SEAS, have created a light, soft, fabric-based “exosuit” that applies assistive force to correct patients’ gait during walking and can be worn during normal daily activities. The exosuit was licensed in 2016 by ReWalk Robotics, which is commercializing it for stroke and multiple sclerosis patients. Laying some groundwork for environmental protection New material sticks to dynamically moving tissues even in the presence of blood Today, a decade after Wyss founded the Institute, 375 full-time staff collaborate and work in 100,000 square feet of research space shared between Harvard’s Longwood Medical Campus and Cambridge sites. The community of scientists, biologists, physicists, chemists, engineers, and clinicians includes 18 core faculty, 16 associate faculty, and numerous students, postdocs, and fellows, as well as more than 25 scientists and engineers recruited from industry with extensive experience in product development and team management across multiple disciplines and fields. In addition to their technology commercialization efforts, Wyss Institute faculty and staff have published more than 2,000 scientific articles, with an average of one paper in Scienceor Natureper month since 2009.“From developing singular insights and cutting-edge approaches to creating bioinspired materials and feats of engineering, the Wyss Institute has and will continue to have a powerful impact,” said Harvard University Provost Alan Garber. “Through the many technologies it creates as well as the partnerships it has cultivated, the institute shines a light on the convening power of Harvard and the creative brilliance of its faculty and staff. We are truly grateful for Mr. Wyss’ generosity and for placing his trust in Harvard.”Garber emphasized the Institute’s alliances with all of the University’s Schools, as well as with other leading academic and clinical institutions in the Boston area and around the world. This collaboration and the bridges it has built between academia and industry have been key to the institute’s ability to accelerate the development of novel diagnostics, therapeutics, and other disruptive technologies.“The Wyss Institute exists because of Hansjörg Wyss’ vision that crossing disciplinary boundaries and collaborating across both different scientific fields and different research institutions is crucial for bringing about transformative change,” said Ingber, who is also a professor of bioengineering at Harvard’s School of Engineering and Applied Sciences. “We are honored and humbled by Mr. Wyss’ continued generosity, and we will continue to strive to push the envelope in both technology innovation and translation of these technologies into products that can bring about near-term positive change worldwide.”A native of Switzerland, Wyss is a philanthropist dedicated to helping save the world’s remaining wild places, protecting and empowering society’s most vulnerable, and encouraging breakthroughs in medicine and science. His philanthropy is made possible by his success in starting and growing a medical research and design company, Pennsylvania-based Synthes USA, whose products have helped millions of patients recover from skeletal and soft-tissue trauma and injuries.Today’s gift is being made through the Wyss Foundation, created in 1998 and known for helping to protect some of the world’s most iconic landscapes — from Montana’s Crown of the Continent to the headwaters of the Amazon River in the Andes Mountains — and ensuring they remain open and accessible to all. Altogether, the Wyss Foundation has invested more than $450 million to help local communities, land trusts, and nonprofit partners conserve more than 40 million acres of land in North America, Africa, Europe, Australia, and South America. Last fall, in a New York Times op-ed, Wyss announced he would donate $1 billion over the next decade to help conserve at least 30 percent of the planet in a natural state by 2030. 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first_imgWe are poised to take digital transformation to the next level, and I’m honored to be Dell’s new Chief Digital Officer to further hone and strengthen our engagement with business partners, cultivate a strong engineering and operational discipline and culture, and lead with simplicity and accountability. The role combines the traditional roles and responsibilities of a CIO along with the emerging role of change agent for digital transformation. It reminds me and my whole organization that we are a key enabler for digital transformation and much more than “keeping the lights on.”The Path to DigitalFor companies that didn’t grow up completely digital, redefining and automating processes to improve operations often aren’t enough. We must also create compelling and efficient experiences for our customers and team members. This often requires us to transform our traditional processes into digital processes, where there are no delays due to manual intervention, batch processes or legacy infrastructure.The destination is clear, but the path to get there isn’t easy. Over the past couple of years, our Dell Digital team, which is the evolution of our IT organization, has been on a path to modernize our own processes and technology, while investing in our team with new skills and ways of working to address this challenge.We call the combination the Dell Digital Way, and the goal is to both digitally transform our IT processes and to enable our business partners to do the same. We’re working in balanced teams, with developers side by side with our business partners, and leveraging our DevOps and private cloud technology and practices. A modern way of working is what Dell Technologies’ products and solutions enable for our customers and what we want to experience in our own work here at Dell.The Next Phase of Our Digital JourneyWe are headed in the right direction with our IT transformation, and the next phase of this journey will be moving forward with our product-oriented approach that will drive more direct accountability for how our solutions are designed and operate. We’re moving Design and DevOps to the forefront of IT, like a software organization. With a better understanding of our customers’ and partners’ needs, we can more quickly adapt and introduce new capabilities to improve the overall experience. All of this relies on our continued work to modernize our applications and infrastructure by migrating to our private/hybrid cloud.A unique aspect of our new operating model is that it features four critical cross-functional journeys aligned to the experiences that people have with us. These are the Customer journey, Team Member journey, Product Group Enablement journey, and Product journey, which is the experience for our own organization to design, develop and deploy solutions. Members of my leadership team will assume responsibility for these journeys to drive focus, accountability and progress across the functional operations.As we drive our strategy from the perspective of the customer experience and operational excellence, I’m confident we have the right people, processes and technology to level up our digital transformation and improve the way we work.last_img read more

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first_imgAs the first semester comes to a close, organizers of this year’s Notre Dame Forum are pleased with the events that have taken place and are preparing for a full agenda next semester, Nicole Stelle Garnett, Forum committee co-chair and law professor at Notre Dame, said. This year’s Forum topic, “Reimagining School,” has already brought several prominent figures to campus, including former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush and New Jersey Gov. Chris Christie. “From the very beginning, we’ve believed that the primary purpose of this year’s Forum should be to provide a space for Notre Dame as a university community … to be as imaginative as possible in forging a meaningful response to the challenges and opportunities that currently confront at risk schools and schoolchildren,” Garnett said. “We still have a whole semester to go, but I’ve been extremely gratified by what we’ve seen so far.” The Forum kicked off on Sept. 26 with an address from former Florida Gov. Jeb Bush. “I think his keynote was the perfect way to launch the Forum,” Garnett said. “He’s established a legacy for aggressively pushing some fairly radical reforms despite significant opposition … It was just the right way to begin a year of ‘reimagining’ education.” Two days later, the Forum brought four experts in education, including the founder of Teach for America, to campus for a panel discussion. “That was a compelling event on a number of fronts,” she said. “What struck me most at the time, and what has continued to stay with me, was how it helped clarify just how important it is that we as a university continue to expand and enhance our investment in at risk schools and schoolchildren.” Gov. Chris Christie delivered the keynote address for the symposium, “Educational Innovation and the Law” in November. “It was interesting to hear an elected official discuss his experience with K-12 education,as well as to challenge the Notre Dame community to think critically about what it can to do make a systemic and sustainable impact in this field,” she said. Garnett said Forum organizers have a full agenda planned for the second semester. On Jan. 27, Terry Moe, professor of political science at Stanford University, will come to campus. “Terry is a nationally acclaimed political scientist and author of several groundbreaking books on K-12 education,” Garnett said. The second semester will also include keynotes from Kathleen McCartney, the dean of the Harvard School of Education, and Diane Ravitch, a well-known historian of education, she said. Garnett said she has high expectations for the remaining Forum events. “I’m hopeful that the events we’ve planned for the spring will provide an opportunity for some very serious conversation about where many of the ‘fault lines’ in K-12 education and education policy currently lie,” she said.”We want to foster serious conversation that can help surface some ideas on the varied roles that Notre Dame can — and must — play in service to K-12 schooling.”last_img read more

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first_imgIt looks like those meetings she may or may not have shown up for last month have paid off! Lindsay Lohan is in talks to star in David Mamet’s Speed-the-Plow in the West End this November. The Mean Girls star revealed the news to The New York Times at a Jeremy Scott fashion show in London. Lohan would play Karen, the role originated by Madonna in the 1988 Broadway production. Speed-the-Plow focuses on two high-powered Hollywood executives, Charlie Fox and Bobby Gould, who have come up from the mailroom together. Charlie brings Bobby a surefire hit with a major star attached. Bobby seems certain to give the green light, until his beautiful new secretary gets involved. The play received its London premiere in 1989 and was revived in the West End in 2000 and at The Old Vic in 2008. A Broadway revival played the Ethel Barrymore Theatre in 2008. “It’s the first time I’ve done a stage play or anything like that,” Lohan told the newspaper. “I’m nervous but I’m excited.” View Comments Lohan rose to fame as a child actress in The Parent Trap. She later starred in Freaky Friday, Confessions of a Teenage Drama Queen, Mean Girls, Herbie: Fully Loaded and Georgia Rule. Last year she starred in the film The Canyons opposite Broadway alum Nolan Gerard Funk. On TV, Lohan has guest-starred on King of the Hill, That 70’s Show, Ugly Betty and Glee.last_img read more

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first_img View Comments The Broadway.com staff is crazy for Culturalist, the website that lets you choose and create your own top 10 lists. Every week, we’re challenging you with a new Broadway-themed topic to rank. With the exciting news that Harry Potter is all grown up and landing in the West End in Harry Potter and the Cursed Child, the Muggles of Broadway.com have been doing nothing but dreamcasting. Who should play everyone’s favorite boy wizard once he’s an adult and has children of his own? He must be British, charming and magical. We’re excluding Daniel Radcliffe just to make you cry to give someone else a shot at what will undoubtedly be an instant hit. Now it’s time to have your say: Who should play a 37-year-old Harry Potter on stage? Our own British, charming and magical Broadway.com Senior Editor Imogen Lloyd Webber kicked off this new challenge with her list of top 10 picks. Now it’s your turn to rank your faves.STEP 1—SELECT: Visit Culturalist to see all of your options. Highlight your 10 favorites and click the “continue” button.STEP 2—RANK: Reorder your 10 choices by dragging them into the correct spot on your list. Click the “continue” button.STEP 3—PREVIEW: You will now see your complete top 10 list. If you like it, click the “publish” button.Once your list is published, you can see the overall rankings of everyone on the aggregate list.Pick your favorites, then tune in for the results next week on Broadway.com!last_img read more

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first_img“Almost two-thirds of teen fatalities in our state aren’t buckled up,” Jones said. “PRIDE trains instructors how to deliver safe driving tools to their community. PRIDE helps parents make it through the process of their teen getting a license without ‘losing their cool’ and helps teens learn how to avoid crashes.” Law enforcement, emergency medical services, health departments, Cooperative Extension educators and fire departments across the state participate in GTIPI’s training and distribute educational materials. Onsite training is conducted at GTIPI’s facilities in Conyers as well as regional locations across the state. GTIPI’s course, “Georgia Teens Ride with PRIDE” is for parents and their new teen drivers. For more information, see http://www.ridesafegeorgia.org or call GTIPI at (678) 413-4281, or toll free at (800) 342-9819. “Even though child safety seats are used by parents more than 90 percent of the time, four out of five seats are installed incorrectly,” said Frankie Jones, GTIPI’s director. “The CPST certification qualifies volunteers to teach parents how to do it right.” Parents and young children benefit from safety professionals and volunteers who achieve national certification in the 32-hour Child Passenger Safety Technician training. GTIPI has four main training and community education initiatives: Child Passenger Safety Technician Certification, Georgia Teens Ride with PRIDE (Parents Reducing Incidents of Driver Error), CarFit and the Online Safety Store. Each area is designed to reach target age groups or address a critical traffic safety issue.center_img By Andrew TurnageUniversity of GeorgiaThe University of Georgia Traffic Injury Prevention Institute has been awarded an $836,470 grant from the Governor’s Office of Highway Safety to continue its education and training programs in the areas of passenger safety education, young and senior driver education and community programming. Designed for mature drivers, CarFit helps seniors stay behind the wheel longer and more safely. “CarFit is a non-threatening way to educate seniors about how to stay safe and comfortable in their car,” Jones said. The Online Safety Store is the primary source statewide for print and electronic traffic safety resources for consumers, educators and professionals. GTIPI manages distribution of materials from the GOHS website, www.georgiahighwaysafety.org. For 24 years, GTIPI has assisted the GOHS in meeting congressional requirements by designing and delivering education that improves safety while traveling in a vehicle. The institute has been a leading resource in traffic safety education in Georgia.last_img read more

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first_imgBy Dialogo September 01, 2009 Rafael Nadal is about to compete in the U.S. Open following his recent return to competition after more than seventy days away from the courts due to tendinitis in his knees, but motivated to try to win the only Grand Slam title lacking on his list of victories, despite the limited preparation he has been able to do for the event. The Spanish tennis player is ready for his first appearance, possibly on Tuesday, against Frenchman Richard Gasquet. “I got here in better shape than expected, but I’m conscious of the fact that I’ve never gotten past the semifinals. If I make it to the quarterfinals or semifinals, I believe that it will be a great tournament for me, and I’ll probably go home satisfied, but later on, over the length of my career, that won’t count for anything. Especially here, at the only Grand Slam tournament I haven’t won. That’s why I’m here to win. If not, I probably wouldn’t have come,” Nadal said. His semifinal appearance last year, when he lost to British player Andy Murray, is the best result that the native of the Balearics has obtained at Flushing Meadows. The Scotsman is precisely the one who has pushed him out of second place in the rankings, marking the first time in the last four years that he will face the season’s last Grand Slam tournament ranked at number three. “I don’t believe that it makes a difference for me that I’m starting out this time as number three. I don’t know how it could make a difference for me to start out as number three,” Rafael Nadal said. Following more than two months without playing due to injury, the Spanish tennis player rejected the idea that he might “be under less pressure” than on other occasions when he has competed in the U.S. Open. “The pressure in the end is the pressure you put on yourself. You know how you are and what you need to do. Less pressure because I’m coming off of an injury? The pressure is what it is. It’s logical that I won’t win the tournament, but I’m here to try to win it,” the number-three player in the world insisted. Rafael Nadal thinks positively. He looks toward the future and feels that his return to competition “isn’t a return, because I haven’t left.” “No, I don’t feel that I have bad luck. I haven’t been worrying about losing the number-one ranking or the number-two ranking. What happened at Roland Garros and missing Wimbledon wasn’t very pleasant, but it’s all been the consequence of showing up poorly prepared. At the beginning it was an almost perfect season; I was playing better than ever. With great results. The best of my career, undoubtedly. I’ve worked hard, and it’s not the case that I’m returning. It’s that I haven’t left. I’m number three in the world. That’s the reality. I’ve played quarterfinal and semifinal matches on hard courts now, in Montreal and Cincinnati. I see myself doing well and capable of winning big tournaments again as soon as possible,” the Spanish tennis player emphasized. The tennis player from Manacor is hopeful about his chances in the tournament and doing something significant. What happened at the Australian Open is an example “You never know what can happen. When I got to Australia, I wasn’t thinking about whether I might win or lose. I worked hard enough to find inspiration and be entirely focused on the competition,” he remembers. “I’ve trained well, following my normal routine, I’ve felt that I’ve been doing well, and now we’ll see. I’m well, calm, and prepared to do the best I can,” Nadal added, emphasizing his “great excitement about participating in this tournament and doing well in it.” “The U.S. Open is a Grand Slam tournament; that’s the first thing. And then it’s in New York, a special city for me, and one of the most important cities in the world. I believe there’s nothing that doesn’t make this tournament special,” Nadal said, eager to start competing in order to evaluate how he feels and judge the level at which he may be able to perform during the tournament. The Spanish tennis player, who acknowledged that he had not been able to follow the opening match of his favorite team, Real Madrid, in the Spanish soccer league – “I wasn’t fortunate enough to be able to watch Madrid play, and now we we’ll see what happens, although there’s high excitement and high expectations” – admitted that he had been more surprised that Swiss tennis player Roger Federer was the father of twins than that he finished first at Roland Garros. “It was more surprising to me that he had twins, because I hadn’t known that. That he won at Roland Garros was more normal. He’s always made it to the finals or semifinals, and it was normal that he would end up winning. Besides, he deserved it,” the Spanish tennis player concluded.last_img read more

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first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York Patricia Cabrera has been missing since Dec. 26, police said.Suffolk County police are seeking the public’s help in finding a Bay Shore woman who has been missing for more than a week.Patricia Cabrera, 34, was last seen leaving work at Mama’s Pizza and Italian Restaurant at 605 Middle Country Road in Centereach at approximately 10 p.m. on Dec. 26, police said.Cabrera is described as 5-foot, 6-inches tall and approximately 125 pounds with brown hair and brown eyes.Police believe she was driving a 2011 black Honda Fit with New York license plates (CZP 4080).Anyone with information is asked to call the Third Squad at 631-854-8352 or 911.last_img